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Apr 072013
 

Education Committee Makes Changes to Education Funding in Governor’s Proposed Budget 

The Education Committee approved a substitute for H.B. 6357 (“An Act Implementing the Budget Recommendations of the Governor Concerning Education”) on March 28, 2013. The bill makes changes to a number of provisions in the original proposal. The following are some key changes.

  • Modifies the proposed ECS formula
  • Changes the weighting in the wealth calculation to weigh property wealth more heavily than income wealth
  • Reduces the proposed foundation amount from $11,754 to $11,525
  • Shifts some funding to the 10 lowest-performing districts
  • Eliminates the PILOT: State-Owned Property grant from the ECS account. This would be the first step in restoring the PILOT program to its current state.
  • Restores the public school transportation grant

Attached are updated town-by-town estimates of the ECS grant based on the Education Committee bill. The bill has been referred to the Appropriations Committee, which has a deadline of April 23.

13-34 Ed Comm Changes to HB 6357

Dec 122012
 

The PTOC is pleased to present results from the recent PTOC  budget survey completed by parents.   As Norwalk Schools enters into its school budget process, the PTOC encourages everyone to get involved. The attached file contains survey data less blank pages created in file conversion, and deletion of survey participant information.

Norwalk PTO Budget Survey Summary_12082012


Please join the PTOC at its December 17th meeting to hear State Representative Gail Lavielle present an update on Connecticut education including ECS, the current state budget, and other education news from Hartford. Representative Lavielle sits on the Education Committee.

Monday, December 17th, 7:00-9:00pm
Norwalk City Hall Community Room

Jun 132012
 

Equalization aid grant amounts as taken from Educational Reform Bill 458.

T1

Town

Grant for Fiscal

Grant for Fiscal

T2

Year 2012

Year 2013

T3 Andover

2,330,856

[2,330,856]2,367,466

T4 Ansonia

15,031,668

[15,031,668] 15,571,383

T5 Ashford

3,896,069

[3,896,069] 3,931,796

T6 Avon

1,232,688

1,232,688

T7 Barkhamsted

1,615,872

[1,615,872] 1,654,360

T8 Beacon Falls

4,044,804

[4,044,804] 4,109,097

T9 Berlin

6,169,410

[6,169,410] 6,280,132

T10 Bethany

2,030,845

[2,030,845] 2,042,361

T11 Bethel

8,157,837

[8,157,837] 8,228,760

T12 Bethlehem

1,318,171

[1,318,171] 1,318,800

T13 Bloomfield

5,410,345

[5,410,345] 5,614,895

T14 Bolton

3,015,660

[3,015,660] 3,038,788

T15 Bozrah

1,229,255

[1,229,255] 1,242,936

T16 Branford

1,759,095

[1,759,095] 1,824,612

T17 Bridgeport

164,195,344

[164,195,344] 168,599,571

T18 Bridgewater

137,292

137,292

T19 Bristol

41,657,314

[41,657,314] 43,047,496

T20 Brookfield

1,530,693

[1,530,693] 1,545,179

T21 Brooklyn

6,978,295

[6,978,295] 7,058,407

T22 Burlington

4,295,578

[4,295,578] 4,354,540

T23 Canaan

207,146

[207,146] 209,258

T24 Canterbury

4,733,625

[4,733,625] 4,754,383

T25 Canton

3,348,790

[3,348,790] 3,421,074

T26 Chaplin

1,880,888

[1,880,888] 1,893,247

T27 Cheshire

9,298,837

[9,298,837] 9,376,495

T28 Chester

665,733

665,733

T29 Clinton

6,465,651

[6,465,651] 6,502,667

T30 Colchester

13,547,231

[13,547,231] 13,723,859

T31 Colebrook

495,044

[495,044] 506,256

T32 Columbia

2,550,037

[2,550,037] 2,563,631

T33 Cornwall

85,322

85,322

T34 Coventry

8,845,691

[8,845,691] 8,918,028

T35 Cromwell

4,313,692

[4,313,692] 4,423,837

T36 Danbury

22,857,956

[22,857,956] 24,554,515

T37 Darien

1,616,006

1,616,006

T38 Deep River

1,687,351

[1,687,351] 1,711,882

T39 Derby

6,865,689

[6,865,689] 7,146,221

T40 Durham

3,954,812

[3,954,812] 3,986,743

T41 Eastford

1,109,873

[1,109,873] 1,116,844

T42 East Granby

1,301,142

[1,301,142] 1,349,822

T43 East Haddam

3,718,223

[3,718,223] 3,765,035

T44 East Hampton

7,595,720

[7,595,720] 7,665,929

T45 East Hartford

41,710,817

[41,710,817] 43,425,561

T46 East Haven

18,764,125

[18,764,125] 19,253,992

T47 East Lyme

7,100,611

[7,100,611] 7,132,157

T48 Easton

593,868

593,868

T49 East Windsor

5,482,135

[5,482,135] 5,650,470

T50 Ellington

9,504,917

[9,504,917] 9,649,604

T51 Enfield

28,380,144

[28,380,144] 28,810,492

T52 Essex

389,697

389,697

T53 Fairfield

3,590,008

3,590,008

T54 Farmington

1,611,013

1,611,013

T55 Franklin

941,077

[941,077] 948,235

T56 Glastonbury

6,201,152

[6,201,152] 6,415,031

T57 Goshen

218,188

218,188

T58 Granby

5,394,276

[5,394,276] 5,477,633

T59 Greenwich

3,418,642

3,418,642

T60 Griswold

10,735,024

[10,735,024] 10,878,817

T61 Groton

25,374,989

[25,374,989] 25,625,179

T62 Guilford

3,058,981

3,058,981

T63 Haddam

1,728,610

[1,728,610] 1,776,625

T64 Hamden

23,030,761

[23,030,761] 23,913,747

T65 Hampton

1,337,582

[1,337,582] 1,339,928

T66 Hartford

187,974,890

[187,974,890] 192,783,001

T67 Hartland

1,350,837

[1,350,837] 1,358,660

T68 Harwinton

2,728,401

[2,728,401] 2,760,313

T69 Hebron

6,872,931

[6,872,931] 6,969,354

T70 Kent

167,342

167,342

T71 Killingly

15,245,633

[15,245,633] 15,625,767

T72 Killingworth

2,227,467

[2,227,467] 2,237,730

T73 Lebanon

5,467,634

[5,467,634] 5,523,871

T74 Ledyard

12,030,465

[12,030,465] 12,141,501

T75 Lisbon

3,899,238

[3,899,238] 3,927,193

T76 Litchfield

1,479,851

[1,479,851] 1,508,386

T77 Lyme

145,556

145,556

T78 Madison

1,576,061

1,576,061

T79 Manchester

30,619,100

[30,619,100] 31,962,679

T80 Mansfield

10,070,677

[10,070,677] 10,156,014

T81 Marlborough

3,124,421

[3,124,421] 3,171,682

T82 Meriden

53,783,711

[53,783,711] 55,561,122

T83 Middlebury

684,186

[684,186] 714,234

T84 Middlefield

2,100,239

[2,100,239] 2,132,776

T85 Middletown

16,652,386

[16,652,386] 17,449,023

T86 Milford

10,728,519

[10,728,519] 11,048,292

T87 Monroe

6,572,118

[6,572,118] 6,592,969

T88 Montville

12,549,431

[12,549,431] 12,715,670

T89 Morris

657,975

657,975

T90 Naugatuck

29,211,401

[29,211,401] 29,846,550

T91 New Britain

73,929,296

[73,929,296] 76,583,631

T92 New Canaan

1,495,604

1,495,604

T93 New Fairfield

4,414,083

[4,414,083] 4,451,451

T94 New Hartford

3,143,902

[3,143,902] 3,167,099

T95 New Haven

142,509,525

[142,509,525] 146,351,428

T96 Newington

12,632,615

[12,632,615] 12,895,927

T97 New London

22,940,565

[22,940,565] 23,749,566

T98 New Milford

11,939,587

[11,939,587] 12,080,862

T99 Newtown

4,309,646

[4,309,646] 4,338,374

T100 Norfolk

381,414

381,414

T101 North Branford

8,117,122

[8,117,122] 8,225,632

T102 North Canaan

2,064,592

[2,064,592] 2,091,544

T103 North Haven

3,174,940

[3,174,940] 3,295,851

T104 North Stonington

2,892,440

[2,892,440] 2,906,538

T105 Norwalk

10,095,131

[10,095,131] 10,672,607

T106 Norwich

32,316,543

[32,316,543] 33,341,525

T107 Old Lyme

605,586

605,586

T108 Old Saybrook

652,677

652,677

T109 Orange

1,055,910

[1,055,910] 1,107,407

T110 Oxford

4,606,861

[4,606,861] 4,667,270

T111 Plainfield

15,353,204

[15,353,204] 15,560,284

T112 Plainville

10,161,853

[10,161,853] 10,346,140

T113 Plymouth

9,743,272

[9,743,272] 9,876,832

T114 Pomfret

3,092,817

[3,092,817] 3,130,001

T115 Portland

4,272,257

[4,272,257] 4,347,783

T116 Preston

3,057,025

[3,057,025] 3,077,693

T117 Prospect

5,319,201

[5,319,201] 5,377,654

T118 Putnam

8,071,851

[8,071,851] 8,251,714

T119 Redding

687,733

687,733

T120 Ridgefield

2,063,814

2,063,814

T121 Rocky Hill

3,355,227

[3,355,227] 3,481,162

T122 Roxbury

158,114

158,114

T123 Salem

3,099,694

[3,099,694] 3,114,216

T124 Salisbury

187,266

187,266

T125 Scotland

1,444,458

[1,444,458] 1,450,305

T126 Seymour

9,836,508

[9,836,508] 10,004,094

T127 Sharon

145,798

145,798

T128 Shelton

4,975,852

[4,975,852] 5,146,279

T129 Sherman

244,327

244,327

T130 Simsbury

5,367,517

[5,367,517] 5,513,204

T131 Somers

5,918,636

[5,918,636] 5,975,301

T132 Southbury

2,422,233

[2,422,233] 2,518,902

T133 Southington

19,839,108

[19,839,108] 20,191,195

T134 South Windsor

12,858,826

[12,858,826] 13,017,444

T135 Sprague

2,600,651

[2,600,651] 2,632,445

T136 Stafford

9,809,424

[9,809,424] 9,930,162

T137 Stamford

7,978,877

[7,978,877] 8,899,110

T138 Sterling

3,166,394

[3,166,394] 3,211,166

T139 Stonington

2,061,204

[2,061,204] 2,079,926

T140 Stratford

20,495,602

[20,495,602] 21,072,199

T141 Suffield

6,082,494

[6,082,494] 6,183,966

T142 Thomaston

5,630,307

[5,630,307] 5,712,479

T143 Thompson

7,608,489

[7,608,489] 7,674,408

T144 Tolland

10,759,283

[10,759,283] 10,866,063

T145 Torrington

23,933,343

[23,933,343] 24,402,168

T146 Trumbull

3,031,988

[3,031,988] 3,195,332

T147 Union

239,576

[239,576] 241,460

T148 Vernon

17,645,165

[17,645,165] 18,316,776

T149 Voluntown

2,536,177

[2,536,177] 2,550,166

T150 Wallingford

21,440,233

[21,440,233] 21,712,580

T151 Warren

99,777

99,777

T152 Washington

240,147

240,147

T153 Waterbury

113,617,182

[113,617,182] 118,012,691

T154 Waterford

1,445,404

[1,445,404] 1,485,842

T155 Watertown

11,749,383

[11,749,383] 11,886,760

T156 Westbrook

427,677

427,677

T157 West Hartford

16,076,120

[16,076,120] 16,996,060

T158 West Haven

41,399,303

[41,399,303] 42,781,151

T159 Weston

948,564

948,564

T160 Westport

1,988,255

1,988,255

T161 Wethersfield

8,018,422

[8,018,422] 8,313,255

T162 Willington

3,676,637

[3,676,637] 3,710,213

T163 Wilton

1,557,195

1,557,195

T164 Winchester

7,823,991

[7,823,991] 8,031,362

T165 Windham

24,169,717

[24,169,717] 24,933,574

T166 Windsor

11,547,663

[11,547,663] 11,854,648

T167 Windsor Locks

4,652,368

[4,652,368] 4,904,674

T168 Wolcott

13,539,371

[13,539,371] 13,685,912

T169 Woodbridge

721,370

721,370

T170 Woodbury

876,018

[876,018] 895,683

T171 Woodstock

5,390,055

[5,390,055] 5,453,688

Jun 122012
 

The Connecticut State Department of Education  presented their expectations this week regarding additional ECS (Educational Cost Sharing)  monies released to  the Alliance Districts.  The  30 lowest performing districts in the state were allocated $39.5 million of the $50 million ECS funding increase and these districts will have an opportunity to apply and compete for additional revenues directed at reform and student achievement.  These additional ECS monies can be use for things like:

  •  K-­3 Literacy Interventions
  •  Additional Learning Time
  •  Talent Development Strategy
  •  School Leader Training for State Evaluation Model
  • Early Childhood Services
  • Student Support and Wraparound Services
  • Other reforms subject to approval

Listed in alphabetical order and not in order of performance are the 30 Alliance Districts:

1. Ansonia
2. Bloomfield
3. Bridgeport
4. Bristol
5. Danbury
6. Derby
7. East Hartford
8. East Haven
9. East Windsor
10. Hamden
11. Hartford
12. Killingly
13. Manchester
14. Meriden
15. Middletown
16. Naugatuck
17. New Britain
18. New Haven
19. New London
20. Norwalk
21. Norwich
22. Putnam
23. Stamford
24. Vernon
25. Waterbury
26. West Haven
27. Winchester
28. Windham
29. Windsor
30. Windsor Locks

SDE Alliance Districts PPT

Apr 022012
 

The following article appeared in  yesterday’s  Sunday Edition of The Hour.   Both city and state representatives, along with NEF, the PTOC and Red Apples have continued to voice concerns over the inherent flaws in the state’s current Educational Cost Sharing (ECS) formula.   Representative Gail Lavielle, even went so far as to propose an amendment to correct the formula, which penalizes communities such as Norwalk, with purportedly high grand list property values but low median income.

Below is the article:

Changes to ECS formula proposed, failed, but scored a win

By MATT COYNE Hour Staff Writer

 

NORWALK — While the amendment to change the Education Cost Sharing formula failed, its sponsor is scoring it a victory in Norwalk’s fight to get equitable funding.

State Rep. Gail Lavielle’s, R-143, amendment would have allowed cities with a significant difference between its net grand list and its median income to decrease by 10 percent the net grand list’s value in the formula’s calculation.

“I thought there was good discussion around it and it has been flagged as an important issue,” Lavielle said. “And from that point of view I’m pleased we had this discussion. I think we’ve put Norwalk’s ECS issue on the radar screen.”

Critics of the current Education Cost Sharing (ECS) formula say the weight of the grand list negatively affects cities with high property values and low median incomes, Norwalk included. That disparity makes various cities and towns seem more affluent than they already are. Lavielle called Norwalk’s lack of ECS?funding a “severe and persistent inequity.”

In her amendment, any town in the top 25 percent in property values, but in the bottom 50 percent in median income would be available fro the 10 percent deduction. According to Lavielle, this would raise Norwalk’s ECS funding from $10 million to $19 million.

There was some vocal opposition to the amendment from, most scathingly from Rep. Andrew Fleischmann, D-18, who said it would “artificially reduce the wealth of some communities” who have demonstrated their ability to pay through its net grand list and it “runs directly counter to the dictates of Horton v Meskill” the court case that established ECS?funding.

State?Sen. Toni Nathaniel Harp, D-10, said the amendment raised a good point.

“I do think that Rep. Lavielle … (has) pointed out one of the dichotomies that exists in Connecticut,” Harp said “It really is kind of a difficult conundrum that we’re in as a state.”

Harp said she did not believe that the disparity should be fixed through ECS?formula changes but did feel “we have an obligation to do something about it.”

Lavielle proposed the amendment during discussion of HB 5014, a bill which contains adjustments to the biennial budget during a meeting of the General Assembly’s Appropriations Committee.

Mar 162012
 

Norwalk State Legislators and Board of Education members traveled to Hartford yesterday, taking a stand against the unfair ECS (Educational Cost Sharing) Formula.  They held a press conference in the state capitol,  furthering the fight started at the beginning of this legislative session regarding Senate Bill 24 and student funding.  REd APPLES has long protested the ECS  formula and has been working diligently with city and state representatives in Norwalk  to demonstrate a strong bi-partisan effort to expose the unfair distribution of school funding and its impact on Norwalk.

The self proclaimed TUFF delegation, named so for “treat us fairly in funding” included Mayor Richard Moccia, House Minority Leader Larry Cafero, Senate Bob Duff, State Representatives Gail Lavielle, Bruce Morris and Terrie Wood,  Board of Education Chairman Jack Chiramonte, Board of Ed. Representative Sue Haynie and Norwalk Education Foundation President and Red Apples Co-Founder Lauren Rosato.  Several residents also joined the convoy up to Hartford.

By taking the fight to Hartford, the delegation hopes to put Norwalk on the map and get the ECS Committee and Governor Malloy to come to Norwalk and discuss this funding issue with residents, particularly as the school district faces significant cuts for the third year in a row.

This website has published the ECS Funding formula in a variety of comparison charts, but below are the current funding  levels for per pupil spending when compared to our own DRG  H.

Town Students Per Pupil
Ansonia 2791 $ 5,579.14
Danbury 10,505 $ 2,337.41
Derby 1590 $ 4,494.48
E. Hartford 8027 $ 5,409.49
Meriden 9187 $ 6,047.80
Norwalk 11,165 $ 995.90
Norwich 5371 $ 6,207.69
Stamford 15,127 $ 588.29
W. Haven 7390 $ 5,789.06

 

 

 

Feb 262012
 

While the leadership of REd APPLES  has long advocated along with many others about the  gross inequities and arbitrary formula for the disbursement of the Educational Cost Sharing (ECS) funds from Hartford,  the Governor’s Education Reform Bill (S.B. 24) presented another opportunity for a delegation of  representatives to once again argue our city’s financial plight.

As the 6th largest city in the state and with a free and reduced lunch student population at 44%,  Norwalk get’s a only a fraction of what it should get.  This is especially disconcerting when one factors in the income tax revenues  sent to our state’s capital.   Because Hartford claims to use a  formula based largely on the the Grand List of property tax values,  Norwalk  is treated  and viewed like  a Darien or Westport when it is obvious, we are not.  Other cities that are wealthier than Norwalk, with fewer free and reduced lunch students AND fewer students altogether get more than Norwalk.

There are provisions in the Governor’s Education Reform Bill (S.B. 24) that address education funding.  As such, Norwalk made a very good showing last week in the Education Committee hearings to make the case for Norwalk.  Below are the transcripts from the testimonies of Norwalk Representative and House Minority Leader, Larry Cafero,  Mayor Richard Moccia,  Board of Education Chairman Jack Chiaramonte,  Board of Education Finance Chair, Steven Colorassi, REd  Apple’s Co-Founder,  Lisa Thomson,  and NEF and REd Apples Co Founder, Lauren Rosato.

2012SB-00024-R000222-Representative Larry Cafero-TMY

2012SB-00024-R000222-Richard A. Moccia-TMY

2012SB-00024-R000221-Jack Chiaramonte-TMY

2012SB-00024-R000222-Steven Colarossi-TMY

2012SB-00024-R000222-Lisa Thomson-TMY

Lauren Rosato_HB 5014

Dec 192011
 

According to a December 16th article that appeared in the Connecticut Mirror, Andrea Stillman was hoping to keep the changes her panel is considering on how schools are financed a secret.  When asked for copies of the handout, committee staff said they had been directed not to provide the information to the public, press or lobbyists.  The Connecticut Mirror was able to obtain a copy from a source.

ECS Reform is incredibly relevant to Norwalk and  Red Apples has advocated and provided testimony on a number of occasions regarding the subject.

Below are the changes being considered by the ECS Task Force.

ECS Task Force Recommendations Table 12 15

 

 

Oct 262011
 

An Educational Cost Sharing (ECS) Task Force has held two meetings in the past week- one in New Haven and the other last night in Waterford.  Publicity about these meetings has been scant at best.  Red Apples learned about the meetings at the last minute and provided written public comments, which are attached below.

The state allocates approximately $2B in taxpayer dollars towards education in a formula known as Educational Cost Sharing (ECS.)  Money is redistributed and allocated to cities and school districts in what can best be described as convoluted, inequitable and an unaccounted for process.  Norwalk taxpayers have  long been short-changed in getting our fair share of tax revenues sent to Hartford, even though we are the 6th largest city in the state and have 43.7% of our students on Free or Reduced lunch.  Advocating for the revamping the ECS Formula should be a TOP PRIORITY for our local politicians, Board of Education members and state representatives. The  Norwalk Common Council passed a resolution regarding ECS funding earlier this year, but that message needs to be made louder to Hartford.

Residents need to write to their elected officials and let them know that Norwalk deserves to get it own tax dollars back in order to properly and fairly fund our school district.  Below is a list of the email’s of  Norwalk’s state representatives:

Bob.Duff@cga.ct.gov

larry.cafero@cga.ct.gov

Gail.Lavielle@housegop.ct.gov

chris.perone@cga.ct.gov

bruce.morris@cga.ct.gov

terri.wood@cga.ct.gov

 

 

ECS Task Force Public Comments

ECS Debate – Two Sides to the Story

Norwalk Common Council – ECS Resolution

Click below to view the Connecticut State Department of Education Bureau of Grants  2010-11 List